Booking Trips for Parents?

Breaking news! Aug. 20: An appeals court has allowed ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft to continue treating their drivers in CA as independent contractors while an appeal works its way through the court.

This is a California registered Prius sporting a lot of stickers supporting AB5 for Uber and Lyft drivers.
Fewer ridesource cars… more stickers!
photo credit: Pymnts.com

Dear Ms. Smartphone:   A few months ago, your column mentioned booking trips for parents with the smartphone app and that has been a lifesaver. My Dad lives out-of-town and needs to get to the hospital for chemotherapy treatment. He likes the independence this gives him even though he has a flip-phone. But, I notice that there are fewer Uber and Lyft vehicles on the road now because of the pandemic. Do you think I should hire a personal driver? Honestly, this could not come at a worse time for us. J.S., San Francisco

Dear J.S.: So true-  you can book a ride for your Dad, and give him wheels when he doesn’t have keys. But, as you note, because of the pandemic there are fewer drivers on the road and economic activity has dialed down. Surely Dad will wait longer to get a ride. But, before you wait your turn on Uber or Lyft, perhaps there is a non-profit that will help? A friend of mine runs a charity that provides free medical transportation for cancer patients in Massachusetts.

If this charity was here in California, there could be problems beyond the economic slowdown and fewer ridesource drivers.  Beginning August 20, the ridesource (aka, ridehail) services might shut down because of the state’s AB5 law.  The law specifies that Uber and Lyft must classify their drivers as employees, and provide benefits like a minimum wage, worker’s compensation, unemployment insurance, and more.  Uber and Lyft have fought the ruling and say that more than 80 percent of their drivers are part-time and work less than less than 40 hours a week.

Finding Alternatives:

But, back to Dad. You should prepare well in advance of his appointment and contact the medical office. They often work with transport providers and Medicaid. Ironically, those contracts may be with UberHealth and Lyft, like the charity I mentioned.  Medical facilities should be able to offer links to community resources, to social workers, and local councils on aging. Just be persistent!

But, if it’s affordable, maybe you should indeed contract with a  driver looking for outside gigs. Medical vans do not tend to be as convenient as Uber or Lyft, and the scheduling needs to be done hours, if not days in advance. Riders say they feel a loss of control and freedom.

Voting Your CHoice:

But, you and your Dad get a chance to weigh in, assuming you are registered to vote in California. On the November ballot Proposition 22 creates a hybrid category for rideshare drivers that will keep employee benefits lower. Meanwhile, Harry Campbell, a ridesource industry insider, has given a nod to an insurance company called ‘Kover’ which already provides health insurance and layoff insurance for drivers. Campbell’s own quote, based on his revenue, was $61.00 a month.

The “time-out” for Uber or Lyft, if it occurs, will not last forever. Campbell reports that their business quickly restores once they come back into the market. What I worry is that people like your Dad who depend on ridesource will be the most impacted. Not only do they need a trip to the doctor, but well-being also depends on having local, connected travel. Sometimes the trip to the doctor is essential, but so is the visit to get an ice-cream cone.