Vaccination Record on Phone?

“Don’t Leave Home Without It?”…..does that apply to the vaccination card?

Three screenshots from a smartphone showing how to use NY state's Excelsior Vaccine Record for Phones.
Should we put a vaccine record on the phone? Credit: verywellhealth.com

Dear Ms. Smartphone:  We are planning Fall travel to the East Coast and can’t decide whether to put our vaccination record on the phone. Unlike a piece of paper that everyone can read, will select people know my family’s details? Will we need to have cellular service or wifi  to show proof?  And, what if the technology does not work in places we go?  Perhaps I am overthinking this. Hector, Corte Madera

Dear Hector:

There are lots of things we store on our phones these days when we travel: a pass like the ‘Clipper Card’ for the bus or train, our plane ticket, hotel keys, and, of course, the holiday photos. So, should we add the proof that we got a Covid vaccine to the smartphone mix?  I am going to give you the high tech solution first and then the low tech one. 

If you already store your airplane tickets on a digital wallet, you will find the vaccine information, aka the vaccine passport, to be similar. In one case, it’s the airline and the TSA that verify your information. Now it’s a  health authority or their proxy. Is that proxy secure? In an earlier Dearsmartphone I weighed the issues and note a date breach at TSA from a trusted third party.

But, that said, there has been a literal race to develop these vaccine passports, alongside the race to develop the vaccine itself. China and Israel were the first countries to implement digital passports. Israel now seem to be ramping up to reinstate a Green Pass (think ‘green’ traffic light). In the U.S., there are multiple data credential centers springing up and no one knows if they will be able to keep your health information safe, secure, and locked down.

HIGH TECH-QR:

If your upcoming trip takes you to New York, there is a first-mover experiment taking place there. The former Governor Cuomo (remember him), IBM, and the department of Public Health have teamed up to offer an ‘ Excelsior Pass’.  People vaccinated in NY have an option to upload basic information like the date they got the Covid vaccines, their birth date, zip code, and phone number. Next they receive a QR code for their phones. When they need to show proof, say at Yankee Stadium, they flash  a picture ID, alongside the QR code on their phones. A scanner to a distributed network verifies that the QR code is valid. The QR codes have to be renewed after six or nine months as the protection from the vaccination is believed to weaken.

But, to confuse matters further, the City of New York is developing a brand new app, also with IBM, so that visitors who live outside the state, like you, can show their credentials. Meanwhile, Walgreen, Sam’s Club, and others have issued their own proprietary apps for uploading digital  health data. It sounds like the NYC/IBM collaboration has more data protections than average but you must still agree to trust their encryption method based on blockchain technology.

LOW TECH-SCAN:

But if you want the low-tech solution before you travel, then either scan, or take pictures of the vaccine cards for your entire family and save them to your phone. Then, if you forget to take the cards, or worse, lose them, you will have a record. It’s not a huge advancement over the first vaccine record that public health officials instituted, in 1884! But it most certainly works. The downside is that people might fake them, making public exposure to the virus more likely. That said, digital records can be faked too, but with a higher level of effort. 

As those under age 12 wait for a vaccine, and other groups question whether they need it at all, those who are vaccinated ask whether it is safe to put the information on our phones.  New issues for new times. Perhaps that is why it was initially called the ‘Novel‘ Corona virus. Safe travels.

Is TikTok Bad for Kids?

An ad for a Dance Camp called "TikTok Dance Party." Targeted to young girls.
After the Dance Party, is TikTok bad for kids?

Dear Ms. Smartphone: Is TikTok bad for kids and specifically for a girl entering the fifth grade? My step-daughter spent a week in dance camp. Now she is excited to share her videos when school begins. She says she wants to keep making them and aims to be a TikTok influencer this Fall. I love this little girl, but she seems so precocious. I never shared this much! Jessica, Los Angeles

Dear Jessica,

Thanks for the timely question as school begins. I hope that Dance Camp also educated their young students on social media. It’s hard to live in Los Angeles, the city of The Hype House without feeling a TikTok presence. 

Commonsense Media has a quick catch up for parents with children under age 13. Thirteen is the site’s official sign up age but there are recommendations if your child is younger and online. I am personally on uncharted territory when it comes to this platform, and the issues change every time I check in on it.

It used to be that getting Pokemon cards and Michael Jordan athletic shoes helped fifth graders gain popularity.  Now it’s social media and TikTok.. Kids look at the videos on their lunch breaks,  at recess, and after school. Of course, that only encourages young kids to get smartphones, and pushes down the age level (see my post on the provisional phone). Personally, I would try to find an elementary school that does not allow phones on campus.

But, with only a week or two before school opens, what should you do? Here are a couple of “provisional phone” lessons to talk over at home:

First, take inventory of the activities that are squeezed out because of  her time spent on TikTok. This inventory should be explicit- how many minutes is she spending  on TikTok in lieu of being outdoors, meeting friends in person,  summer reading, and soon, doing school work? TikTok videos are only 15 seconds in length, but they take gobs of time to rehearse and edit.

As you complete the inventory ask  if TikTok is compromising her ability to “be still.”  Children need to discover the importance of just being present, of being here. Some associate this with the ability to be bored, but it’s not quite the same. We do not know at what age we develop that capacity, but it needs to be nurtured before tweens get phones. It does not bode well for your step-daughter’s development if the smartphone robs her ability to just sit and “Be”.

There are some procedural questions I would also explore with her. Does anyone know how the TikTok algorithm  rewards talent and creates a star (according to the The Hollywood Reporter- it’s a not). Is this Chinese owned app “safe” when it comes to privacy and sharing? (not, according to the Indian government and issues raised by MIT computer scientists in 2020). And is posting TikTok images of friends and strangers ethical if you don’t have their explicit approval? 

And importantly, prepare your tween for social disappointment. Her videos from dance camp may be smashing, but there is lots of other content. For example, how is she going to handle it if she goes online and learns from her friends’ posts that she was not invited to a classmates’ sleep-over party or or big birthday bash? 

According to Moms who follow their tweens on to TikTok, this experience is corrosive  to mental health. They think it is creating a generation of pre-teens and tweens with “FOMO” that no adult could emotionally handle. Anxiety, social pressure, and insecurity are amplified.

Fortunately, you can monitor and supervise your step-daughter’s TikTok account today since she is only in fifth grade. But, she may shut you out by tenth grade.  By that point, her  online postings will be peer to peer. What we can glean about social media and teens (and this may change in five years) is that the content is hyper-focused on body image and appearance. And, the need for digital validation becomes addictive. 

If your step-daughter wants to be an astronaut/ a physician/ or a social media star- expose her to real people and real activities. And, if being a rising star on social media and TikTok remain on her list, then for every hour on TikTok, make an equal offsetting hour in the dance studio. In a couple of years you will not be able to monitor your child’s social media account and supervise what she posts. So, make this time precious, and use it offline.

Smartphone Olympics

The Tokyo Olympics don’t seem the same when they are streamed on the phone…

The five colored rings for the Olympics

Dear Ms. Smartphone: I went to college on an athletic scholarship (water polo) and am finding  the Tokyo Olympics on smartphones to be cringe-worthy. I can’t relate to this new generation of athletes. On top of it, my significant other is streaming the daily highlights on her phone. Am I wrong to question what is taking place, and should I be annoyed that she chooses to watch the event on her phone? Taki, San Francisco

Dear Taki: I will start with viewing, and note that millions more are watching the Olympics this summer on their phones.  I have to agree that is a visual loss on phones. The price of doing so is reduced viewing options and less coverage of the all events, including the pageantry of the opening day ceremony.  

I found an interesting poll from a group called SportsPro. While Americans still find viewing sporting events on phones to be rare that is not the case in other parts of the world, particularly Asia. There, viewership for sporting events numbers is larger. Roughly 33 percent of the viewers in Thailand, 28 percent in South Korea, and the Philippines watch sports on their mobile device. 

Since you are an athlete, you probably miss the grace and beauty of the competition, and seek more than the final score. It’s like watching a theater performance on your phone- you get the plot but not the nuance. Most people watching on their phones are probably multitasking, so that splinters their attention further. To draw eyeballs, content shifts away from the competition and towards the personal drama and backstory. That seems to be where the Olympics have ascended this year. 

Social Media rising Up

I assume you are fixing on the onscreen meltdown of athlete  Simone Biles. It is indeed a new moment in sports history. A little bit of instability gathers a lot of social media attention. Wall St. Journal columnist Daniel Henninger astutely notes that social media has allowed us to democractize neurosis.

Not so naive perhaps: it may be of economic note for the 2021 Olympics. More and more viewers, like your significant other, are watching on phones. Yet the revenue guarantees were made by broadcasters during an earlier time, when viewership was expected to be larger and more committed (not multitasking).   In 2012  the Summer Olympics attracted roughly 31M viewers on TV, and both in 2008 and 2016, roughly 27.5 watched. The 2021 numbers are not so viable for Peacock, the broadcaster. Only 14 to 15 M people stream on their phones. Good news: after Simone Biles’ press conference  the number of streamers increased. 

You mentioned that you were a competitive athlete, so you probably had moments of performance fear and insecurity. However, until the 2021 Olympics the norm was that we handled this within a small circle of friends and coaches. Social media has made “socialable empathy” fair trade.  As our attention to the big screen scales down, we can garner followers and revenue on the smaller screens of social media.  Let the games begin! 

Missing More than Crowds

That said, I want to close with an additional observation. In an earlier post I noted how the lack of face to face meetings and “zoom all the time” was leading to wacky decision making, in that case it was the local school board. There may be a parallel effect as the athletes in Tokyo are deprived of  cheering crowds and the adrenaline/ audience rush.

Might their onscreen behavior during the 2021 games be another example of cultural norms gone awry when we have a dearth of face-to-face interaction? We tend to think we are just watching a game but norms have changed and the athletes may be reacting to that difference.